Recent Stories

a man wearing a ball cap and T-shirt that reads South Carolina 7 sits on a boat in the Cooper River

SC 7 Expedition aims to protect beautiful places in Palmetto State

August 02, 2022, By Alexis Watts

Despite the brutal mid-July heat enveloping Congaree National Park, there were big smiles and cheerful chatter as dozens trekked several miles through the old growth bottomland hardwood forest – stop No. 4 on a monthlong tour of seven of South Carolina’s natural wonders. The tour is part of the South Carolina 7 Wonders Expedition, a 350-mile hiking, rafting and kayaking journey designed to highlight precious natural resources while also bringing greater awareness to the impact of global climate change.

Man holding glass of water with prescription pills next to him on a table

Taking certain opioids while on commonly prescribed antidepressants may increase the risk of overdose

August 01, 2022, Ismaeel Yunusa

While doctors prescribe the opioid oxycodone to treat moderate to severe pain after surgeries and injuries, these have also become a common drug of abuse resulting in over 70% of U.S. drug overdose deaths. Pharmacy professor Ismaeel Yunusa writes for The Conversation on how taking oxycodone at the same time as certain antidepressants can increase the risk of opioid overdose.

Teen athlete drinks water out of gatorade tub

How to keep teen athletes safe from heat illness as sports practice begins amid a brutally hot summer

August 01, 2022, Susan Yeargin

There are good reasons that teen athletes start the first few weeks of preseason practice slowly. The body needs time to adapt when an athlete of any age begins to exercise or train for a sport in hot conditions. Athletic training professor Susan Yeargin writes for The Conversation on how to keep players safe from heat illness.

Students and alumni working at hotel, people dining in background

UofSC hospitality and tourism management program leads SEC, makes national top 10

July 26, 2022, Allen Wallace

For the fourth consecutive year, the University of South Carolina is among the top 10 in the country in hospitality and tourism management. The ShanghaiRanking’s 2022 Global Ranking of Academic Subjects — Hospitality & Tourism Management places South Carolina No. 1 among Southeastern Conference universities, No. 9 in the U.S. and No. 18 worldwide.

artist rendering of new UofSC nursing facility at Lexington Medical Center

UofSC, Lexington Medical Center enter new partnership

July 05, 2022, Kyndel Lee

The University of South Carolina College of Nursing and Lexington Medical Center have partnered to build a state-of-the-art nursing simulation lab and teaching space to provide clinical training for UofSC’s growing nursing student population.

professor Khalid Ballouli shows some of his professional baseball cards

HRSM professor researches topic outside his field, but inside his heart

June 28, 2022, Page Ivey

Khalid Ballouli knows first-hand what life is like for an aspiring professional ballplayer. It was his personal experience, which included six years as a pitcher in the minor leagues after playing for the Southeastern Conference’s Texas A&M University, that led him to his 10-year research project interviewing young players and their families about their experiences in travel baseball.

Doctor preparing a syringe and a woman with a face mask on is watching

Should you get a COVID-19 booster shot now or wait until fall?

June 28, 2022, Prakash Nagarkatti, Mitzi Nagarkatti

As COVID-19 vaccines continue to be effective in preventing hospitalizations and deaths, many people have found themselves unsure whether to wait on new, updated formulations of the COVID-19 vaccines or to mix and match combinations of the original vaccine strains. School of Medicine Columbia professors Prakash Nagarkatti and Mitzi Nagarkatti write for The Conversation on whether you should get a COVID-19 booster now or wait until fall.

Michael Sutton stands in front of the UofSC College of Engineering and Computing.

Sutton among the greatest scientists the field of applied mechanics has ever seen

June 20, 2022, Abe Danaher

This is Michael Sutton’s lifetime achievement award. His Major League Baseball Hall of Fame induction. His Heisman Trophy; maybe even his Nobel Prize. When Sutton receives the 2022 Timoshenko Medal on Nov. 2, he will officially be recognized as one of the greatest scientists the field of applied mechanics has ever seen.

brick exterior of Booker T. Washington High School in Columbia, South Carolina

Grant advances UofSC's efforts to create destination for preserving, teaching civil rights history

June 20, 2022, Carol J.G. Ward

The University of South Carolina’s Center for Civil Rights History and Research will receive $500,000 in federal funding to further its mission to preserve civil rights history and tell critical stories of the movement. The African American Civil Rights grant administered by the National Park Service will be used to continue rehabilitation and preservation of the historic Booker T. Washington Auditorium Building.

Letters in air mail envelopes from Otto Frank to Cara Wilson-Granat spread on a table.

Letters from Anne Frank's father, Otto Frank, donated to UofSC Anne Frank Center

June 08, 2022, Alexis Watts

The Anne Frank Center located at the University of South Carolina is now home to 100 letters and cards written by Otto Frank, the father of Holocaust victim and world-renowned diarist Anne Frank. The donation comes as the world honors her life and legacy on the 75th anniversary of the publication of her diary and her birthday on June 12.

image of brick block with 2x4

UofSC engineers develop disaster-resistant building materials

June 01, 2022, Chris Horn

For the past 10 years, Fabio Matta, an associate professor of civil and environmental engineering, has been engineering earthen building blocks made from local soil. Up close, the blocks don’t look like anything special, but their simplicity is the appeal — the blocks don’t require firing in energy-intensive kiln furnaces and can stand up to the worst Mother Nature can throw at them.

Sign in lobby of a building that says ticket holders

Conflicts over language stretch far beyond Russia and Ukraine

May 24, 2022, Stanley Dubinsky, Anyssa Murphy, Harvey Starr, Michael Gavin

There are many instances around the world of people who speak different languages living alongside each other, or those living near an international border to speak the language of the neighboring country. College of Arts and Science faculty write for The Conversation on conflicts over language and how it is used as a tool of politics and power.

Ed Madden

For scholar and poet Ed Madden, going public is the name of the game

May 24, 2022, Craig Brandhorst

Ed Madden is well known on the University of South Carolina campus as the director of the Women’s and Gender Studies program and as a dynamic classroom instructor. He is just as well-known as a creative writer and arts advocate in Columbia, South Carolina, where he is wrapping up his term as the capital city’s inaugural poet laureate.

A young woman in hospital scrubs treats a patient

Students, alumni work to transform health care in rural communities

May 20, 2022, Alexis Watts

Spring break normally means a time for University of South Carolina students to say goodbye to hard work and relax for a week, but for the past 10 years, hundreds of students from the Capstone Scholars program have chosen to challenge themselves culturally.

University of South Carolina campus with focus on a tree with pink flowers.

Students learn to find the human experience in business journalism

May 17, 2022, Savannah Bennett

The Baldwin Business and Financial Journalism Initiative is changing the mold, encouraging students to embrace a form of business journalism that goes beyond the numbers. Just in its fourth year, this program has evolved quickly and led two journalism students, Connor Hart and Emma Dooling, to win multiple awards.

electric car plugged into power source

Incentivizing purchase of green vehicles is not always a straightforward proposition

May 13, 2022, Chris Horn

In an ideal world, perhaps everyone would drive electric cars or use public transportation powered by renewable energy — and that world would have cleaner air and far less greenhouse gas emissions. But in the real world many consumers remain skeptical of plug-in electric and hybrid cars or shy away from those vehicle’s higher price tags. Government-sponsored incentives have helped to some degree, but research by two faculty members in the Moore School of Business reveals those incentives sometimes come with unintended consequences.

Syringes forming a hashtag symbol on a blue background

Countries with lower-than-expected vaccination rates show unusually negative attitudes to vaccines on Twitter

May 10, 2022, Jungmi Jun

With the tone of social media conversations regarding the COVID-19 vaccine are varying around the world, this research team wanted to understand if these tones matched differing country-level vaccination rates. Journalism and mass communications professor Jungmi Jun writes for The Conversation on the influence emotions toward vaccines may have on whether a person decides to get a COVID-19 vaccination or not.

Michael Beets

Public health scientist sets high bar in research, mentoring productivity

May 02, 2022, Chris Horn

In 14 years at the University of South Carolina, Michael Beets has notched an enviable record of research productivity — more than 200 publications, a Google Scholar h-index of 50 with nearly 12,000 citations while serving as principal investigator on seven large NIH grants and associate director of an NIH-sponsored Center of Biomedical Research Excellence.

Rebecca Janzen

Professor explores aspects of Mexican culture in literature

April 27, 2022, Page Ivey

Spanish and comparative literature professor Rebecca Janzen has checked all the North America boxes: She is from Canada, works in the U.S. and her field of study is Mexican literature and culture. And, nine years removed from her Ph.D., she has published four books that all look at some aspect of Mexican culture or government and certain populations inside the country.

QR code abstract

The Best of Times?

April 25, 2022, Craig Brandhorst

A lot happens over the course of an academic year, and there’s absolutely no way to highlight everything. So, no, don’t think of this as a Best Of list. This is merely a smattering of the achievements and memorable moments that defined 2021-22, a small taste of the year that was. Trust us, there’s plenty more where this came from — and plenty more to come.

Lorri Unumb

After son's diagnosis, alumna becomes leading advocate for families affected by autism

April 25, 2022, Carol J.G. Ward

Alumna Lorri Unumb's journey to becoming an advocate for families affected by autism began when she and her husband Dan noticed their son Ryan wasn’t behaving and developing like other children. Ryan was diagnosed with autism shortly before his second birthday. Today, Unumb is internationally known for her advocacy. She has written ground-breaking autism insurance legislation and co-founded, with her husband, a nonprofit center for families affected by autism in South Carolina.

Freshman students walk the hallway in between classes during the bell break

Legacy of Jim Crow still affects funding for public schools

April 19, 2022, Derek W. Black and Axton Crolley

The Brown v. Board of Education decision framed racial segregation as the cause of educational inequality. Brown's focus on physical segregation inadvertently left important and less obvious aspects of local funding inequality unchecked. This still drives underfunding in predominantly poor and minority schools. Law professor Derek W. Black and law fellow Axton Crolley write for The Conversation on the historical connection between segregation and states' reliance on local school funding.

Digital generated image of syringe filling of COVID-19 vaccine from bottle against viruses on blue background

Why we can't 'boost' our way out of the COVID-19 pandemic for the long term

April 19, 2022, Prakash Nagarkatti and Mitzi Nagarkatti

As mRNA vaccines used in the U.S. against COVID-19 have been successful at preventing hospitalization and death, the vaccines have failed to provide long-term protective immunity to prevent breakthrough infections. School of Medicine Columbia professors Prakash Nagarkatti and Mitzi Nagarkatti write for The Conversation on the COVID-19 booster and retooling existing vaccines to increase the duration of protection.

School of Music senior Madie Willard stands in front of the Koger Center wearing a gray jacket and pink top

Student organizes event to share joy of music with Deaf community

April 18, 2022, Carol J.G. Ward

An interactive, multisensory Music Field Day organized by School of Music senior Madie Willard will offer children who are deaf or hard of hearing and their families an opportunity to experience music through the senses. Headlining the event will be DEAFinitely Dope, an internationally recognized deaf hip hop (dip hop) artist based in the Atlanta area.

Kelly Adams on the UofSC Horseshoe

UofSC alumna guides employer's gift to Center for Civil Rights History and Research

April 12, 2022, Megan Sexton

Alumna Kelly Adams, managing director of state government and regulatory affairs for the energy infrastructure company Williams, was instrumental in her employer’s gift of $1.5 million to the university's Center for Civil Rights History and Research.

David Cutler in steampunk style

Music professor gets creative in managing change

April 05, 2022, Dan Cook

When you think of change management, you might think of the Harvard Business Review or McKinsey’s global consultants. You probably don’t think about musicians. But in David Cutler’s new book, the distinguished professor of entrepreneurship and innovation in the School of Music takes lessons that began in the arts and translates them into a broad-based way of thinking about change in any other facet of life.

Susan O'Malley

UofSC instructor inspires the next generation of leaders in sports

March 23, 2022, Megan Sexton

Susan O'Malley, the first woman to run a professional sports franchise, has brought her knowledge, insight and enthusiasm to the University of South Carolina, focusing on giving students a taste of the fast-paced field of sports and event management.

New COVID-19 variant molecule

What is the new COVID-19 variant BA.2, and will it cause another wave of infections in the US?

March 22, 2022, Prakash Nagarkatti and Mitzi Nagarkatti

The COVID-19 omicron variant has been the predominant source of rising infections around the world. BA.2 is the latest subvariant of omicron and is spreading quickly in many countries. School of Medicine Columbia professors, Prakash Nagarkatti and Mitzi Nagarkatti, write for The Conversation on this new strain, if there will be another surge in the U.S. and how to protect yourself.

photo illustration of Black hands playing a piano

Professor Birgitta Johnson connects music with culture, experience and emotion

February 02, 2022, Carol J.G. Ward

As a professor of ethnomusicology, Birgitta Johnson studies the interaction of music and culture – why and how people make music and why it's important as a part of their identity or tradition. Much of her research is done in the field talking with and engaging with communities, including public events such as an upcoming music series she is hosting with the Columbia Museum of Art.

Coronavirus molecule on blue background

Is the omicron variant Mother Nature's way of vaccinating the masses?

February 01, 2022, Prakash Nagarkatti, Mitzi Nagarkatti

The characteristics of the COVID-19 omicron variant has many people wondering if it could act as a vaccine of sorts, inoculating enough people to effectively bring about herd immunity. School of Medicine Columbia professors Prakash Nagarkatti and Mitzi Nagarkatti write for The Conversation about immune response to COVID-19.

Invisible No More book jacket mockup

Essay collection sheds light on the largely unknown history of Black people at UofSC

January 31, 2022, Chris Horn

The University of South Carolina desegregated in 1963, but the history of Black people on campus extends back to the university’s beginning in the early 19th century. In 10 illuminating essays edited by Robert Greene II and Tyler Parry, Invisible No More (USC Press 2021) tells that story.

Nursing students at UofSC

UofSC ranks No. 1 in online graduate nursing program

January 24, 2022, Megan Sexton

The University of South Carolina’s College of Nursing retained the No. 1 national ranking for its online graduate nursing program, according to U.S. News and World Report’s annual online program rankings released Tuesday (Jan. 25).

donna walker

Leadership program puts pharmacists on forefront of improving health care

January 11, 2022, Page Ivey

Helping develop and inspire pharmacy leaders is the goal of the Walker Leadership Scholars Program at the University of South Carolina’s College of Pharmacy, says program founder Donna Walker (1979 pharmacy, 1984 MBA). Each year, the competitive program selects two high-capacity students from the first-year pharmacy class to be scholars for three consecutive years.

A car on a sales lot with a green price sticker on the windshield with other cars in the background.

Why is inflation so high? Is it bad?

December 17, 2021, William Hauk

Consumer prices jumped 6.8% in November 2021 from a year earlier – the fastest rate of increase since 1982, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics data published on Dec. 10, 2021. The biggest jumps during the month were in energy, used cars and clothing. Economics professor William Hauk explains in The Conversation what’s driving the recent increase in inflation and how it affects consumers, companies and the economy.

photo of title page of Shakespeare's third portfolio with a sketch of william shakespeare on one side and the title on the other

Gift of rare Third Folio enhances UofSC's Shakespeare collection

December 14, 2021, Carol J.G. Ward

Third Folio of Shakespeare’s plays printed in 1664 has a permanent home at University of South Carolina Libraries. The book, a gift from Chicago attorney Jeffery Leving, along with the university’s copies of the Second and Fourth folios, will provide a rare opportunity for students, faculty and other researchers.

Photo of a blister pack of medicine being held an adult man.

Use of HIV prevention treatments is very low among Southern Black gay men

December 09, 2021, Oluwafemi Adeago and Xiaoming Li

Barriers such as stigma, homophobia, poverty, access, distrust of the medical system and misinformation make Southern Black gay men less likely to use antiretroviral treatments to prevent HIV infection use, Oluwafemi Adeago and Xiaoming Li, Arnold School of Public Health, write for The Conversation.

Glynnis Hagins wearing a black dress and cream and cream jacket stands in a brick courtyard with stone benches and fall trees in the background.

Law student to focus on housing security and stability through prestigious fellowship

December 06, 2021, Carol J.G. Ward

Glynnis Hagins, a third-year law student at UofSC, has received a Skadden Fellowship that will allow her to pursue her passions of law, education and public interest. She is one of 28 Skadden Fellowship recipients for 2022 and the first UofSC law student to receive the prestigious award, one of the more competitive in the country.

Adel Nasiri

New faculty spotlight: Adel Nasiri

November 19, 2021, Craig Brandhorst

Adel Nasiri joined the University of South Carolina as a distinguished professor of electrical engineering in August, following a 16-year career at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. His research on energy conversion, microgrids and batteries has taken on added import as sustainability, efficiency and resilience efforts ramp up during the age of climate change.

Photo of midsection of a person while they inject insulin

Fewer diabetes patients are picking up their insulin prescriptions

November 18, 2021, Ismaeel Yunusa

Changes in insulin prescription rates because of the pandemic underscore the challenges that people with diabetes face in accessing care, Ismaeel Yunusa assistant professor of clinical pharmacy and outcomes sciences, writes for The Conversation. The effects of the pandemic on diabetes go beyond insulin prescriptions. As COVID-19 overwhelmed health care systems, people with chronic conditions like diabetes have experienced significant disruptions in routine and emergency medical care.

Family nurse practitioner Tamieka Alston-Gibson

UofSC graduates help fill the gaps in rural health care

November 16, 2021, Megan Sexton

As the country marks Rural Health Day this week, the University of South Carolina works — through its School of Medicine, College of Nursing, Arnold School of Public Health and other areas — to understand and improve the delivery of health care in rural and underserved communities.